Refs

Back to coordinate list.

In order of addition to list:


[1] Mangalam, S.M. and Pfenninger, W., "Wind-Tunnel Tests on a High
    Performance Low-Reynolds Number Airfoil," AIAA Paper 84-0628,
    March, 1984.

    Pfenninger, W., and Vemuru, C.S., "Design of Low-Reynolds Number
    Airfoils -- I," AIAA Paper 88-2572-CP, AIAA 6th Applied
    Aerodynamics Conference, Williamsburg, VA, June 6-8, 1988,
    pp. 639-655.

    Pfenninger, W., Vemuru, C.S., Mangalam, S.M., and Evangelista, R.,
    "Design of Low-Reynolds Number Airfoils -- II," AIAA Paper
    88-3764-CP, AIAA 6th Applied Aerodynamics Conference, Williamsburg,
    VA, June 6-8, 1988, pp. 1305-1319.


[2] Althaus, D., "Niedriggeschwindigkeitsprofile," Friedr. Vieweg &
    Sohn Verlagsgesellschaft mbH (publisher) Braunschweig/Weisbaden,
    Germany, 1996, 591 pages.  ISBN 3-528-03820-9


[3] Drela airfoil links
    http://www.charlesriverrc.org/articles.htm
    http://www.monkeytumble.com/hlg/supergee.htm


[4] Selig airfoils used on the Opus 100-inch span (standard class) RC
    sailplane (designed by Selig around ~1991).  These airfoils started
    life as proprietary sections, and on 12/6/02 they were made public.

    The Opus is still available from Northeast Sailplane Products: 021206-opus.pdf

    MSS 
    Dec 12, 2002



[5] Selig airfoils used on the carbon Blackhawk 113.5-inch span (open
    class) RC sailplane (designed by Selig around ~1991).  The Blackhawk
    is no longer produced.  These airfoils started life as proprietary
    sections, and on 12/6/02 they were made public.  Thanks go to the
    original backers of the Blackhawk project: Ray Olsen, Don Scegiel,
    and Doug Diesen (Scottsdale, AZ).

    Blackhawk vintage advertising: 020522-blackhawk.pdf

    MSS 
    Dec 12, 2002


[6] How do I "know" this is the 1903 Wright Flyer even though in NACA
    Report 93 it does not say so explicitly?  I don't know; however, I
    am labeling it as such based on communications with Prof Fred Culick
    at Caltech.  He has done considerable research on the topic and
    believes that this airfoil is very close to the 1903 Wright Flyer
    airfoil.  Keep in mind this aircraft had deformable fabric-covered
    wrapping wings, so as hard as one might try it is only possible to
    approximate the 1903 Wright Flyer wing section with a single
    airfoil.

    MSS 
    Dec 12, 2002


[7] SA7024/5/6 were part of a low Reynolds number airfoil study
    involving trips.

    Gopalarathnam, A., Broughton, B.A, McGranahan, B.D, and Selig,
    M.S., "Design of Low Reynolds Number Airfoils with Trips," AIAA
    19th Applied Aerodynamics Conference, AIAA Paper 2001-2463,
    Anaheim, CA, June 2001.
    c50_2001_GopaBroughtMcGranahSelig_Trips_AIAA2001_2463.pdf